• -€310.00
1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI...
1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI...
1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI...
1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI...

1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI (FIRMA G. GARIBALDI) SOTTOSCRIZIONE LIRE 25 - ROMA

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1867 - SOCCORSO A SOLLIEVO DEI ROMANI (FIRMA G. GARIBALDI) SOTTOSCRIZIONE  LIRE 25 - ROMA

BEAUTIFUL FINANCIAL HISTORY FIND

General Garibaldi had established the Roman emigration center, as stated in the Proclamation to the verse of every money order, in Florence. From here he launched this subscription in favor of the population of Rome still pontifical (taken of Rome 20 September 1870).

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Description

Printed on non-watermarked paper. The issued copies must have a dry stamp on the allegorical image (Lupa capitolina breastfeeding and written "Centro dell'emigrazione Roma"). The back is the same for all cuts. Tickets not issued lack signatures and dry stamp. Handwritten signatures of: Bonpiani Agneni Caraffa; autograph signature of Giuseppe Garibaldi. Tickets are signed with one or two names (in addition to Garibaldi's) and the different combinations of signatures determine a more or less pronounced rarity. One size for all cuts: mm. 180 x mm. 100.

Giuseppe Garibaldi (Nice, 4 July 1807 - Caprera, Archipelago of La Maddalena, 2 June 1882) was an Italian general, patriot, leader and writer. A prominent figure in the Italian Risorgimento, he was one of the most famous Italian historical figures in the world. He is also known as the "hero of the two worlds" for his military achievements both in Europe and in South America.

Considered by the historiography and popular culture of the twentieth century it influenced, the main Italian national hero, began his movements around the world as an officer of merchant ships and then as a long-time captain in command, while his most famous military enterprise was the Expedition of the Thousand, which annexed the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies to the nascent Kingdom of Italy during the Unification of Italy. Mason of the 33rd degree of the Grand Orient of Italy (he also briefly held the office of Grand Master), admittedly anticlerical, he was the author of numerous writings and publications, mainly of memorialism and politics, but also novels and poems.

In 1867, taking advantage of the popularity derived from the victory of Bezzecca, Garibaldi was attempting to invade Rome again. He promoted a collection he called "Obolo della Libertà" by contrasting it with the "Obolo di San Pietro", and he became interested in the Roman insurrectional center, forming an emigration center based in Florence.  He participated in the International Peace Congress, September 9, 1867 in Geneva, where he was elected honorary president.

He prepared an attack counting on the internal revolt of the city; after a series of referrals, without the support of the state, on September 23 he left Florence, but the day after September 24, 1867 he was arrested. The President of the Urban Council Rattazzi acted in time by having Garibaldi arrested in Sinalunga, and taken to the Citadel of Alexandria. 25 deputies protested the incident: since the Nice was elected in the South, he came to break parliamentary immunity and the soldiers who had to watch him listened to his proclamations from the prison window.  He was then taken on 27 September first to Genoa and then to Caprera, an island in quarantine for cholera, where he was a prisoner, watched over and the island controlled by the Regia Marina.

He organized a daring escape using Luigi Gusmaroli as his double. While the man replaced Garibaldi, the Nice left the island on October 14, lying on an old snipe bought years earlier and hidden. He arrived at the islet of Giardinelli, and, after having forded, he arrived at La Maddalena and stayed with Mrs. Collins. With Pietro Susini and Giuseppe Cuneo they arrived in Sardinia, after having rested they left again on October 16th and after traveling on horseback for 15 hours, 17 embarked, later reaching Florence on the 20th. Departing from Terni reaching Passo Corese on the 23rd, he counted among the his men about 8,000 volunteers, in what was recognized as the "Campaign of the Agro Romano for the liberation of Rome". After a first attack in Monterotondo on October 25th, he took the papal stronghold on October 26, 1867, burning the door using a fiery chariot, entering it with his men.

On the 29th it reached Castel Giubileo and then at Casal de 'Pazzi, on the 30th until the dawn of the 31st it remained in sight of Rome but there was no revolt that awaited and withdrew its troops. Garibaldi did not know of the proclamation of the king who had sedated the rebellious spirits, despite the sacrifice of the Cairoli brothers (Clash of Villa Glori) and the sacrifice in Rome of the Tavani Arquati and Monti and Tognetti decapitated in 1868.

He decided to go to Tivoli: the departure was scheduled for 3 November at 3 am but was postponed to 11 am, there were about 4,700 arrived in Mentana, met the 3,500 pontiffs led by Hermann Kanzler, but managed to make them retreat; then came the 3,000 Frenchmen led by Charles De Failly, equipped with the Chassepot rifle breeder rifle in what will be called the battle of Mentana. In front of the fire, Garibaldi continued the attack but at a later announced charge he was stopped by Canzio, he then decided to withdraw the troops.

He left with a train from Orte to Livorno, but at the Figline Valdarno station he was arrested again and locked up in Varignano on 5 November, remaining there until 25 November, after which he returned to Caprera. As a deputy he resigned in August 1868.

Product Details

Place of issue
Roma
Year of issue
1867
Nation of issue
Regno d'Italia
Rarity Index
R8
Quotation Index
S7

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