1973 - METROPOLITANA MILANESE (MM)...

1973 - METROPOLITANA MILANESE (MM) PRESTITO OBBLIGAZIONARIO 7% - MILANO

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1973 - METROPOLITANA MILANESE (MM) - MILANO

OMOLOGATA DAL TRIBUNALE DI MILANO IL 10 AGOSTO 1972

CERTIFICATO AL PORTATORE PER N. 1.000 OBBLIGAZIONI NOMINALI DA LIRE 1.000 PER UN VALORE COMPLESSIVO DI UN MILIONE

MILANO - 3 DICEMBRE 1973

Splendida grafica con stemmi sui lati rappresentanti le porte di Milano
Porta Nuova - Porta Ticinese - Porta Romana - Porta Orientale - Porta Comasina - Porta Vercellina

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Description

The Milan Metro (Italian: Metropolitana di Milano) is the rapid transit system serving Milan, Italy, operated by Azienda Trasporti Milanesi. The network consists of 4 lines, identified by different numbers and colours, with a total network length of 96.8 kilometres (60.1 mi), and a total of 106 stations, mostly underground.[1] It has a daily ridership of about 1.4 million on weekdays.

The first line, Line 1, opened in 1964; Line 2 opened 5 years later in 1969,[6] Line 3 in 1990, and Line 5 in 2013.[9] A fifth line, Line 4, is currently under construction. The Milan Metro is currently the largest system in Italy for length, number of stations and ridership.

The architectural project, by Franco Albini, Franca Helg and Bob Noorda, was awarded in 1964 with a Compasso d'oro, the most prestigious award for Design in Italy.

History

The first project for the network in 1952.

The first projects for a subway line in Milan were drawn up in 1914 and 1925, following the examples of underground transport networks in other European cities like London and Paris. Planning proceeded in 1938 for the construction of a system of 7 lines, but this too halted after the start of World War II and due to lack of funds.

On 3 July 1952 the city administration voted for a project of a metro system[11] and on 6 October 1955 a new company, Metropolitana Milanese, was created to manage the construction of the new infrastructure.[10] The project was funded with ₤ 500 million from the municipality and the rest from a loan. The construction site of the first line was opened in viale Monte Rosa on 4 May 1957.[10] Stations on the new line were designed by Franco Albini and Franca Helg architecture studio, while Bob Noorda designed the signage.[10] For this project both Albini-Helg and Noorda won the Compasso D'Oro prize.

The first section from Lotto to Sesto Marelli (21 stations) was opened on 1 November 1964, after 7 years of construction works. The track was 12.5 km (7.8 mi) long, and the mean distance between the stations was 590 m (1,940 ft).[12] In the same year, in April, works on the second line started. Passengers on the network grew constantly through the first years of service, passing from 37,092,315 in 1965 to 61,937,192 in 1969.

The green line from Caiazzo to Cascina Gobba (7 stations) opened five years later. During the 1960s and 1970s the network of 2 lines was completed, and both lines had 2 different spurs. In 1978, the lines were already 17.6 km (10.9 mi) and 23 km (14 mi) long respectively, with 28 and 22 stations.

The first section of the third line (yellow), with 5 stations, was opened on 3 May 1990 after almost 9 years of construction works. The line opened just before the World Cup. The other 9 stations on Line 3 opened to the southeast in 1991, and northwest to Maciachini Station in 2004.

In March 2005 the Line 2 Abbiategrasso station (south branch from Famagosta) and the Line 1 Rho Fiera station opened. The intermediate station of Pero opened on December 2005. A north extension of Line 3 to Comasina (4 stations) and a new south branch on the Line 2 to Assago (2 stations) opened in early 2011.

The first stage of the Line 5, covering the 4.1 kilometres (2.5 mi) from Bignami to Zara opened on 10 February 2013.[13] The 1.9-kilometre (1.2 mi) second stage, from Zara to Garibaldi FS, opened on 1 March 2014.The 7-kilometre (4.3 mi) third stage, from Garibaldi FS to San Siro Stadio opened on 29 April 2015, with some intermediate stations not in service at that time; as of November 2015, all the stations have been opened.

The metro replaced several interurban tramroutes of the original Società Trazione Elettrica Lombarda (STEL) tramlines. In particular the Line 2 to Gessate. The only remaining suburban tram line to Limbiate is shortened to Comasina, the endpoint of Line 3.

Product Details

Place of issue
Milano
Year of issue
1973
Nation of issue
Italia

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